This tab shows a selection of the Census 2011 and scenario data generated for selected between-zone lines in the chosen region (see Model Output tab for details of the lines included). The full csv dataset contains further details concerning mode share in Census 2011; the cycling, walking and driving levels in each scenario; and the associated health and carbon impacts. You can download the full csv dataset for the lines and routes here, alongside geographic and attribute data to be read by R (.Rds) or GIS programs such as QGIS (.geojson)

Straight lines geographic file format and attribute data: CSV GeoJSON Rds -

Fast route geographic file format: GeoJSON Rds -

Quiet route geographic file format: GeoJSON Rds -

Route Network geographic file format and attribute data: GeoJSON Rds -



This tab shows a selection of the Census 2011 and scenario data generated for all zones in the chosen region. The full csv dataset contains further details concerning mode share in Census 2011; the cycling, walking and driving levels in each scenario; and the associated health and carbon impacts. You can download the full csv dataset for the zones here, alongside geographic and attribute data to be read by R (.Rds) or GIS programs such as QGIS (.geojson):

CSV GeoJSON Rds -

About the Propensity to Cycle Tool

This is the online home of the open source transport planning system, the Propensity to Cycle Tool (PCT). The PCT is released under the Affero GPL: it is free to use, copy and modify, e.g. to create versions for new cities and states. Please cite the paper describing the PCT if you use it in your work (Lovelace et al., 2016).

The PCT Team

Co-investigator: Lead Data Analyst
Co-investigator: Lead Developer
Co-investigator: Lead Policy and Practice

Aim of the PCT

The PCT was designed to assist transport planners and policy makers to prioritise investments and interventions to promote cycling. The PCT answers the question: 'where is cycling currently common and where does cycling have the greatest potential to grow?' The PCT can be used at different scales.

First, the PCT is a strategic planning tool. Different visons of the future are represented through various scenarios of change, including the government’s draft Cycling Delivery Plan target to double cycling in a decade and the more ambitious ‘Go Dutch’ scenario, whereby cycling levels are reached in England (allowing for English hilliness and trip distances). By showing what the rate of cycling could feasibly look like in different parts of cities and regions, and illustrating the associated increase in cycle use on the road network, the PCT should inform policies that seek a wider shift towards sustainable transport.

Second, the PCT can also be used at a smaller scale. The scenario level of commuter cycling along a particular road can be used to estimate future mode share for cycling on that corridor. This can be compared with current allocation of space to different modes, and used to consider re -allocation from less sustainable modes to cater for cycling growth. In other cases, low current or potential flows may indicate a barrier, such as a major road or rail line, causing severance and lengthening trips. This could be addressed through new infrastructure such as a pedestrian and cycle bridge.

Central both to strategic and smaller-scale use is the question of where to prioritise high quality cycling infrastructure of sufficient capacity for a planned growth in cycling (Aldred et al 2016).

In summary the PCT is a planning support system to improve cycling provision at many levels from regions to specific points on the road network. For further information on the thinking underlying the tool's design, and the methodology used to create it, please see (Lovelace et al. 2016). To view the underlying source code, please visit Github/npct.

Funding & Acknowledgements

The work was initially funded by the Department for Transport (DfT) to create the National Propensity to Cycle Tool for England (PCT-England). We would also like to thank the EPSRC and ESRC for Impact Acceleration funding.

We would like to thank Brook Lyndhurst for facilitating Phase 1 of the DfT contract and Atkins for facilitating Phase 2.

We would also like to acknowledge the support and encouragement we had from Shane Snow the DfT tool commissioner who cut through bureaucratic hurdles to help us make this tool open source, promoted it to the DfT Board, and secured key data and analysis from other parts of Government

We would like to thank CycleStreets for providing data on routes.

Liability

The PCT uses transparent and tested methods on the best available data. However we cannot accept liability for any loss or damage caused.

Contact Us

For more information or questions, please contact us at: pct@pct.bike.

References

Aldred, R., Elliott, B., Woodcock, J., Goodman, A., 2016. Cycling Provision Separated From Motor Traffic: a systematic review exploring whether stated preferences vary by gender and age. Transport Reviews 2016. http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01441647.2016.1200156

Lovelace, R., Goodman, A., Aldred, R., Berkoff, N., Abbas, A., Woodcock, J., 2016. The Propensity to Cycle Tool: An open source online system for sustainable transport planning. Journal of Transport and Land Use 10.

Welcome to the User Manual for the Propensity to Cycle Tool (PCT).

This was last built on 2017-02-07.

This is work in progress and is being developed as part of a suite of training materials during 2016. To request more information or provide feedback, please email us at pct@pct.bike or report issues on our GitHub issue tracker. Contributions to the project are welcome. This file, for instance, can be edited online at github.com/npct/pct-shiny.

Additional FAQs

1. Does hilliness matter for cycling? Do the Dutch just cycle more because the Netherlands is flatter?

2. How does propensity to cycle differ between England and the Netherlands?

3. Why focus on the direct routes?

4. What are the estimates of future cycling rate based on?